Ship's Blog - Fishermen's Finest

230th Plenary Session The North Pacific Fishery Management Council will meet the week of October 3, 2016 at the Hilton Hotel, 500 W. 3rd Avenue, Anchorage, AK 99501.

Details of the meetings to be held during the week follow:

Scientific and Statistical Committee: Oct. 3-6, 8am - 5pm, King Salmon/Iliamna Room
Advisory Panel: Oct. 4-8, 8am - 5pm, Katmai/Dillingham Room
Ecosystem Committee: Oct. 3, noon - 5pm, Lupine Room
Ecosystem Committee: Oct. 4, 9am - noon, Room 205 Old Federal Bldg
Halibut Management Committee: Oct. 4, 8am - noon, Lupine Room
Enforcement Committee: Oct. 4, 1-4 pm, Lupine Room
Council: Oct. 5-11, 8am - 5pm, Aleutian Room

All meetings are open to the public, except executive sessions.

We believe safety isn't an accident - you have to work proactively to maintain a safe workplace and to train a safe workforce.  That is why we encourage our crew to better themselves by attending safety courses offered through organazations such as

Not only do we encourage our crew, we step up to the plate and pay for our crew to attend.  Further, a more trained crewmember will move up in the pay scale aboard the vessels.  It's a win-win-win.

WETA of California has awarded Dakota Creek Industries of Anacortes Washington the contract to build 3 new high speed ferries.

We congratulate our friends at Dakota Creek, who are in week 60 of construction of our America's Finest® in Anacortes - Hull #63.

The three new vessels for San Francisco Bay Ferry will have a 445 passenger capacity (plus 50 bikes) and will travel at approx. 39mph on their route between Vallejo and San Francisco - reports the Times Herald Online

They also report that the first of the vessels will be delivered by late 2018, with the other two coming at 6 month intervals thereafter.

 

We believe safety isn't an accident - you have to work proactively to maintain a safe workplace and to train a safe workforce.  That is why we encourage our crew to better themselves by attending safety courses offered through organazations such as

Not only do we encourage our crew, we step up to the plate and pay for our crew to attend.  Further, a more trained crewmember will move up in the pay scale aboard the vessels.  It's a win-win-win.

American No.1's assistant Chief Engineer made the news in the Idaho Statesman earlier this week.  

Ross Carrico started out as a fish processor aboard the American No.1 just over 6 years ago (June 2010); his wife attended an Employment Informational Meeting in Boise (Ross was at sea) and Ross tracked us down in Bend Oregon to start the hiring process a few months later.

In his time aboard the American No.1, Ross has pursued a career in the Engine Room and has earned his USCG Assistant Engineer's License with support from Fishermen's Finest.  He's working towards his full Chief Engineer's License and we're sure he'll get there soon.  

When he's not aboard the vessel, as you can see in the article, he works with his father in a grounds maintenance company based in Nampa, Idaho.  

Volunteers repair graffiti at Nampa’s Wilson Ponds 

America's Finest® under construction at Dakota Creek Industries (Hull #63) in Anacortes Washington reached a milestone yesterday when the wheelhouse, having been built in the construction shed (AKA 'the Big House') was wheeled across the street and lifted atop the new vessel. 

Visit Harry von Stark's bLog www.FloatingSteel.com for more detailed imagery of the placement as well as a weekly photo diary of the first Northwest purpose-built factory trawler since Dakota Creek Industries built the C/P STARBOUND in 1989.  

MORE PHOTOS: America's Finest Wheelhouse Slideshow

Fishermen's Finest, Skipsteknisk & Dakota Creek ~ a team of excellence.

We believe safety isn't an accident - you have to work proactively to maintain a safe workplace and to train a safe workforce.  That is why we encourage our crew to better themselves by attending safety courses offered through organazations such as

Not only do we encourage our crew, we step up to the plate and pay for our crew to attend.  Further, a more trained crewmember will move up in the pay scale aboard the vessels.  It's a win-win-win.